“…but that through Klimt I wanted to be made immortal” (Friederike Beer)

Gustav Klimt was a much sought after portrait painter in Vienna at the turn of the century—from the 19th to the early 20th! Klimt not only captured a curious, lasting likeness that intrigued his models and their spouses (patrons!). There were more “traditionally-based portrait painters in Vienna” but, the rising middle class and devotees of the avant-garde were casting their gaze at Klimt for he offered something unique and mysterious.

It was well known in the Vienna art circles that Friederike Beer had already received a portrait by another painter in Vienna. Word got around the art community! Beer began to instinctively desire another portrait of herself but this time from Klimt. She knew he was selective in terms of accepting commissions for his portraiture skills. As Beer approached Klimt’s house/studio, she was somewhat prepared for a gruff response from the artist. After knocking at his residence’s door, Klimt answered and looked questioningly toward Beer. She indicated she wanted a portrait of herself by Klimt. The artist’s response acknowledged that she already was in possession of a portrait by a competent painter. Why was she asking him for another portrait of herself? Beer, hesitated but knew she better have a solid reason as Klimt’s selective repetition was well known in Vienna. After a brief moment, Beer gathered her wits together and responded: ”I was afraid he was going to turn me down and so I answered quickly that yes, this was certainly true, but that through Klimt I wanted to be made immortal, and he accepted that.”

What thoughts run through your mind when you read that this woman wanted another portrait of herself, this time by Klimt, and her expressed reason to convince him to paint her was “I wanted to be made immortal…”?

Gustav Klimt, Portrait of Friederike Beer, 1916

Published by: roberttracyphd

Academic professor at the University of Nevada Las Vegas. I teach theory courses in Art and Architecture History. In addition, I also curate exhibitions on campus as well as in other venues nationally and internationally.

39 Comments

39 thoughts on ““…but that through Klimt I wanted to be made immortal” (Friederike Beer)”

  1. When I think of the word “immortal”, immediately what comes into mind is the everlastingness of something. Klimt was a renowned decorative artist which many were in awe of seeing such blatant eroticism in his works. While that, Klimt also incorporated a lot of gold leaf in his paintings, making his art more recognizable, shining, and brilliant. When Friederike Beer knocked upon his door and said that she wanted to become immortal through the hands of Klimt, she meant that she wanted to be made recognizable, shining, and also brilliant, giving her an everlasting impression through the art of Gustav Klimt.

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  2. My initial thought when reading about Beer wanting a second portrait that would make her “immortal” is that Klimt’s art was so highly regarded that it was considered timeless. To be made immortal in a painting would have to mean that the painting itself would withstand interpretations and critique throughout time because it is so quality respected, so I can only assume she thought that highly of Klimt’s work. Klimt was also known for his paintings being allegorical, so there is definitely a story present and waiting to be discovered in the portrait of Beer.

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  3. When I think of the word “immortal”, I think of words such as “timeless” or a “moment that stands still” and that is exactly what Art can be. A moment captured in time. Gustav Klimt was a highly sought after portrait artist and for good reason. His artwork was unique and was well known, so it made sense that Friederike Beer would want his services. I think what ultimately made him say yes was the compliment of calling his artwork “immortal.” That even though she already had a competent artist making a self portrait, she went out of her way to specifically get his art, therefore not only giving him high praise but really showing the impact that one’s artwork can have over a person. Even till now we revere art from past centuries, so Beer was able to get what she desired. A self portrait that we all look at till this day, leaving her mark and making her presence “immortal” for all of us to see.

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  4. Lizbeth Ramirez | Art 473

    My initial thoughts after reading that Friederike Beer wanted another portrait of herself by Klimt, I didn’t think of it as putting down the other artist but rather getting a new perspective through Klimt’s work. Beer believed that Klimt could make her “immortal” and that, to me, reminds me of something being unforgettable or forever lasting. Through Klimt’s style he could achieve that for her because he offered a different approach to portraits. He made sure his subjects were made to be “unique and mysterious”. This isn’t to say that the other traditional based portrait painters weren’t good enough but that they had their style and he had his. This just applies to any artist, we all have our own style of art and ideally not one is better than the other because they all have their strengths and weaknesses. So when Beer decided to get another portrait I thought of it as she was getting another point of view, in the sense of immortality.

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  5. Although Beer already had a portrait painted of her by another artist, it’s no surprise that she would want a portrait made by Klimt. He was notorious for his portraits as his style was very unique and recognizable. When I see the word “immortal” I think of something that lasts through multiple generations. I think that what Beer wanted when she said ,”I wanted to be made immortal,” is something that would be recognizable and have a lasting legacy long after she had passed.

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  6. It is an honor whenever someone powerful believes in your talents especially whenever you have been seen as a “weirdo” within the art world. Beer was trying to define how life would be like if she was immortal, it was kind of like having a vision of herself in the future and wondering who would she be surrounded by if everyone died and what type of occupation or importance would she have within society.

    Beer looks nostalgic in the painting, I am not sure it is because she knows that her kingdom or world is surrounded by greed for power. I observe the low, medium, and high-class fighting over power and cultural, political, and religious reasons. I can observe luxurious objects that make reference to Beer’s wealth.

    I love the way the Klim tells a story and made up possible scenarios and trough a collage that represents the unknown and the mystery of life. Sometimes as an artist I search for feedback or different points of view from different people about my artwork. I like the way Beer is still the main focal point of the composition. I like the patterns and the texture and the combination of red and purple values of her coat. Her make up looks vibrant and bright. Beer had a deep appreciation for art that’s why she decided to have a controversial piece fo art made by Klim. A perfect example of wanting to have different options and perspectives for art is whenever we buy a house if we decorate it with objects produced by a specific company or artist.

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  7. I feel like when you are that highly regarded in the community for your skill that people want you to make them “immortal” you are an incredibly unique artist. I feel like what she means by immortality is in reference to Klimt’s unique artistic style at the time. There were a variety of artists that could create traditional based portraiture but they didn’t create pieces like Klimt that were distinguishable as their own identity. He commissioned a piece that is recognizable to his artistic style and that it is the “immortal” that Beer wanted. I feel like as artists, we strive for this same want for immortality in our work, and to achieve this we have to distinguish ourselves as artists and our work like Klimt has.

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  8. Assuming that the previous work was done by Egon Schiele, there is not much comparison when it comes to why she wanted a portrait from Klimt. When I hear the phrase, “…to be made immortal,” impression is the first word that comes to mind. I see the picture that Klimt has created and there is an impression of power that lies within his work. Colors so bright and patterns that seem engraved that it makes you wonder what kind of power this portrait had possessed. Vibrant backgrounds that tell a story, stories that seem to never go away. It would make one assume that this is an important piece. One that would have significance to be preserved and discovered by many. I could assume that Beer wanted a portrait that would capture her uniqueness. And previously, she did. The unique style had left an impression that would capture the eyes of those who looked upon it. But nothing was quite like Klimt’s works that could be seen even from a thousand feet away.

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  9. The first thoughts that run to my mind when she said she wanted to be made “immortal” was she knew how deep and extraordinary Klimt’s work was. Klimt’s paintings( with no ill will towards the other artist) was philosophical and passionate. She knew that by him doing this her painting would be bringing the attention in towards her. That everything around her is ageless. Beer wanted her painting, to me, to be immortal so that as we are doing now to talk about it.

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  10. When I read about her desire “to be made immortal” I am reminded of just how delicate humanity really is. Art can communicate through the ages which can be meaningful because it communicates in a different way than just words alone which often can be limiting or have the possibility of being misunderstood.

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  11. The first things that went through my mind are, one, that Frederike Beer was well off enough to request and pay for multiple paintings. Two, she must have been deeply involved in the painting/art community to know not only where to find Klimt but also what his style and aesthetic of painting she would be portrayed in. Three, she was prepared to be turned away. If she was prepared to be turned away, she had time to choose what and why she wanted another portrait of herself, this time with a different style. Beer’s response to Klimt is not only flattering but also demonstrates her connection and time in the art world. She knew his work was unique and would still be unique to this day, and that’s why she chose the words she did.

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  12. Friederike Beer wanted a portrait from Klimt, a piece specifically made for her, created by a unique and talented artist. Through his art, she would be “immortal” because while she as a person may be forgotten with time but this painting of her would be remembered and continue existing as artwork created by a celebrated artist. In the 19th to early 20th century, unless you were famous or part of a well-known event, photographs of people were generally more of a family keep-sake. As an artist, Klimt was probably flattered by Beer’s response to his question and agreed to paint a portrait of her. Having someone personally ask you to make a portrait of them because they think that your art is timeless and iconic is very flattering.

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  13. It is an honor whenever someone powerful believes in your talents especially whenever you have been seen as a “weirdo” within the art world. Beer was trying to define how life would be like if she was immortal, it was kind of like having a vision of herself in the future and wondering who would she be surrounded by if everyone died and what type of occupation or importance would she have within society.

    Beer looks nostalgic in the painting, I am not sure it is because she knows that her kingdom or world is surrounded by greed for power. I observe the low, medium, and high-class fighting over power and cultural, political, and religious disagreements. I can observe luxurious objects that refer to Beer’s wealth.

    I love the way the Klim tells a story and made up possible scenarios and trough a collage that represents the unknown and the mystery of life. Sometimes as an artist I search for feedback or different points of view from different people about my artwork. I like the way Beer is still the main focal point of the composition. I like the patterns and the texture and the combination of red and purple values of her coat. Her make up looks vibrant and bright. Beer had a deep appreciation for art that’s why she decided to have a controversial piece fo art made by Klim. A perfect example of wanting to have different options for art is when we buy a house if we decorate it with objects produced by x type of companies or artists.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Jonathan Quinones

    It is an honor whenever someone powerful believes in your talents especially whenever you have been seen as a “weirdo” within the art world. Beer was trying to define how life would be like if she was immortal, it was kind of like having a vision of herself in the future and wondering who would she be surrounded by if everyone died and what type of occupation or importance would she have within society.

    Beer looks nostalgic in the painting, I am not sure it is because she knows that her kingdom or world is surrounded by greed for power. I observe the low, medium, and high-class fighting over power and cultural, political, and religious disagreements. I can observe luxurious objects that refer to Beer’s wealth.

    I love the way the Klim tells a story and made up possible scenarios and trough a collage that represents the unknown and the mystery of life. Sometimes as an artist I search for feedback or different points of view from different people about my artwork. I like the way Beer is still the main focal point of the composition. I like the patterns and the texture and the combination of red and purple values of her coat. Her make up looks vibrant and bright. Beer had a deep appreciation for art that’s why she decided to have a controversial piece fo art made by Klim. A perfect example of wanting to have different options for art is when we buy a house if we decorate it with objects produced by x type of companies or artists.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. In one of my favorite eras of art, Klimt was the treated as a figure of hegemony. Beer must of paid well in order to be painted by Klimt as it showed the artist was selective when it came to commissions. As for her quote, “to be made immortal” I believe she has great pride, vanity, and narcissism. However, with Klimt’s hands she got what she wanted as the painting has gone far into the future. In the painting, we can see she is well adorned in garments and is pictured in front of what seems to be Asian influenced figures. She is immortalized through the historical art behind her. The palette Klimt displays are an interplay of tones and patterns as well which make it interesting to view.

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  16. This woman is infatuated with Klimt’s power. From her statement, “to be made immortal” suggests that she sees Klimt’s painting will last forever, not only in physical form, but also in contextual form. The world will forever value Klimt’s significance, and Beer will be an honorable mention in art society’s future discussion. I agree with Randall’s comment on Beer’s personality: great pride, vanity, and narcissism. The shinning, gorgeous, and mysterious style from Klimt suits her well in a way.

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  17. The word “immortal” is incredibly heavy by nature. To be able to live or exist forever is unheard of and just the slight idea of it would make many people shiver, but through the beauty of art, anything can be immortalized. When I read that this woman wanted another painted portrait of herself and that she wanted to be made “immortal”, all I got from it was that she was narcissistic and vain, seeing how she already had a painted portrait of herself. Klimt might have taken it as a compliment though, as in she was saying that anything he would paint would be immortalized, giving his artistic talents the highest of praise. In a way, she was right in this painting being forever immortalized, with many people around the world still looking at this piece many decades later.

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  18. No one suspected that almost a century after Klimt’s death that he would be part of the most expensive artists of the demanding international art market. In the early 2000s, several of his paintings from his gold period were trade for exorbitant prices. The main reason was because his work stir up a lot of controversy for being too pornographic. Klimt’s ‘Golden Phase’ was marked by positive critical reaction and financial success. Many of his paintings from this period included gold leaf. These works of art are timeless and immortal and for good reason. They are by far his best work and everyone admires him now because of them. Klimt is one of the most polarizing artists ever and Beer knew that his painting of her would make her presence in the world last forever.

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  19. The sense of immortality through painting is relatable to me. Nowadays we see extremely old paintings of many characters we know their history and others who we have no idea who they were but are depicted. Still, their physical image was kept through centuries and even if no one remembers or knows who the person is, it’s still in the world with us through some artist’s painting. Beer’s sense of “immortality” might go a little further, since Klimt had fame for uniqueness and mystery in his painting, which gave him the early title of a successful artist whose paintings are destined to be precious. People knew this and that’s why she wanted another portrait, but from Klimt. She knew her image not only would be preserved through time, but it would be put easily on the spotlight and become more valuable than most.

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  20. When I read that this woman wanted a portrait of herself painted by Klimt so that she could be made immortal, I think that she felt like Klimt understood a part of her that other artists had yet to capture. Beer knew that Klimt would be able to capture her essence in a painting for eternity. Klimt encapsulated more than just a picture of Beer, he captured who she is, the colors that reflect her energy and the shapes that represent how she sees the world. I would say that Klimt did in fact make Beer immortal within this painting because this painting is being learned about it art history classes today!

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  21. Ironically, when I read the word “immortal,” the initial thought that came in my mind was that it is possible- in the form of art. I believe art has the power to make impossible to possible. Immortal or everlasting in human life is thought to be impossible, but through art, the woman made it possible for herself to become immortal, through a painting, through art. Even if it is realistically thought to be a nonsense, I appreciate her attempt, as it shows the power of art and the privilege one can hold through it.

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  22. Ironically, hearing that one wanted to be immortal through a portrait, the initial thought that came in my mind was that it is possible- in the form of art. I believe art has the power to make impossible to possible. Immortal or everlasting in human life is thought to be impossible, but through art, the woman made it possible for herself to become immortal, through a painting, through art. Even if it is realistically thought to be a nonsense, I appreciate her attempt, as it can show the power of art and the privilege one can hold through art.

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  23. This story as a whole is very intriguing. This is my first time learning about Klimt and his impressive portraits. After doing some research I found that I was fascinated by his art style. I like his use of color, texture, and sense of feminism that he applies to his work. When reading the story about Beer, I was confused as to why she would want another portrait. It seems that they had some sort of connection that she and the other Vienna artist did not. After looking at the painting I could see why she sought out Klimt. Like many of the other comments noted, Klimt did a great job of capturing her energy, feminism, and who she was as a person. In a way, this painting granted her, her wish of immortality. That is the beauty of art is that once it is created it if not tampered with, it will last forever. Hence why we are still discussing it today. I applaud Klimt’s work and I admire him as a painter.

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  24. The way I felt with this reasoning was that Beer realized that life is not permanent and that the best reasonable way to live “immortal” was to be documented in something such as a painting that will hopefully last far beyond her own life expectancy. Many people in the past and even to the present have wanted to be immortal, I remember hearing stories about historical figures dying as an attempt to live out such a false dream. I feel that with this scenario, Beer realized that physically living forever was not a realistic desire and that the closest thing to that immortality was to be remembered for as long as possible. Hence why she would approach an artist to make even more work of her.

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  25. When considering Beer’s response to Klimt’s inquiry as to why she sought another portrait of herself, I find myself in awe at just how appropriate her answer was. Certainly, many skilled painters existed in their day, but none quite so as Gustav Klimt. Beer’s initial hesitation out of fear of being rejected goes to show just how reputable and extraordinary an artist Klimt was—a god amongst mortals, if you will. To achieve immortality through a work of art is not a mere skill, but a gift, and Klimt was one who held such power.

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  26. I believe Friederike Beer knew that Gustave Klimt had a unique style that no one else had seen at the time. Although controversial to some, his work was different from the common style of naturalistic portraiture. I looked up some of his old paintings online and they were all natural realistic portraits. I believe he most likely got tired of trying to please people by creating conservative art. I think he finally won over that battle and started expressing himself truly when he began painting in his own radical style. Friederike Beer knew his art would live on because it was his own style that no one else had at the time. Klimt had a style that made people imagine what was going on in the painting. His later work was very decorative and detailed. When I look at his later work there is so much he fit on his canvas and paintings it’s unique how he handled space in his composition. Some blocks were decorative and stylized while others were realistic like the hands and face of his models. His work seems spiritual to me because of the symbolism. His work probably spoke to her even though she already had another portrait done, I think the way she approached him was appropriate and in a way complimented him.

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  27. I think her wit and intelligence to answer with such a response, only helped her justify Klimt’s own personal, narcissist within himself. One can say she, Friderike beer is a narcissist for wanting, yet, another portrait done of herself. Perhaps this is how she knew how to answer the question asked in order to receive what she wanted.

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  28. It is clear that Friederike Beer understood Klimt to be a groundbreaking artist, who could interpret the world in such a unique way that a portrait done by him would go far beyond a simple commission. An artist with such distinct style would create work so equally distinct that it becomes eternal. Klimt paints in such a way that you are captivated by the subject(s) whether or not they are known to you. This is not always true for many commissioned portraits. I believe Beer could see that a portrait done by Klimt would turn her into art, going far beyond the skill of reproduction. The difference between this and a common portrait commission lies in Klimt’s personal expression that is individual to him, unable to be copied, and therefore a lasting treasure by the artist- immortal.

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  29. My initial thoughts after reading that Friederike Beer wanted another portrait of herself by Klimt. Friederike believed that Klimt could make her “immortal” through his paintings. I assume that she liked the first painting, but her thoughts were that if he makes second one that she looks absolutely gorgeous that she will continue living in the paintings. Art is going to stay, even after Klimt and Beer are gone. I assume that she meant by her statement that she will never die, because she will stay “immortal” in the paintings.

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  30. You can have a portrait of yourself made by any artist, but having one made by a famous artist will most likely result in a timeless work of art. Some of the most famous portraits of all time have immortalized the visages of women, such as the Mona Lisa, Virginie Gautreau in Madame X by Sargent, and even Klimt’s own Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer. By asking Klimt to do her portrait, Beer most likely recognized Klimt’s unique artistry and knew he would not just reproduce her likeness, but recreate her in a way that would last past their lifetimes. Finding such an artist seems like a really unique, once in lifetime kind of moment, so I wouldn’t necessarily think she asked Klimt to spite the artist who did her previous portrait, or because she didn’t like it, but rather she most-likely recognized Klimt’s individuality and took the opportunity to ask him to do another portrait.

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  31. The idea of immortality when it comes to art is to have a true likeness of one’s self. Not just in physical form, but capturing one’s personality as well. While the camera was invented by this point, and had been for a hundred years, a portrait was a truer sense of a person. You can see her youthful glow in her flushed cheeks and the psychedelic colors and print of her clothing. It beautifully captures her and preserves her at that age for forever. There’s also the added bonus of having a prominent artist paint your portrait. Anyone could paint a portrait and it could preserve the subject, but when a well known artists paints your portrait everyone will know you. We know her name now because of this portrait, which made her immortal. She will forever be talked about, her image studied, because her portrait holds a place in art history. If she had only had the one portrait of herself, it would have had prosperity in her family, yet the world wouldn’t be saying her name. Her face wouldn’t be studied in Universities. There is the idea of immortalizing one’s current self in art, and the idea of immortalizing one’s self by having the world know your name for generations after your death. By convincing Klimt to paint her portrait she achieved both.

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  32. My initial thought upon reading this was that Friederike Beer was left hungry after the first portrait she received of herself. She felt like her image could have been encapsulated or that her likeness could have been captured in a much better performance. I am not saying she was completely unsatisfied with the first painting, but after she received it she wanted more. She went after the biggest fish in the sea, which at the turn of the century was Gustav Klimt. In a sense Friederike Beer was pushing her limit, she went to Klimt personally to get a portrait painting of herself done. She understood the limited availability of his time and talents, but she wanted her likeness to be captured by the best, she wanted to be immortalized. She achieved immortality through a medium that would survive and be acknowledged even after death.

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  33. From learning about Gustav Klimt, he was extremely popular during that time. Friederike Beer appreciated the fine arts and the community, so it makes sense that she would want a piece of his work in her collection. What is so interesting here is she knew of the potential. Even though I’m certain that she was pleased with what she already had, why would Beer settle? Klimt was an artist who can encapsulate not just likeness, but the ideal essence of even the most abstract idea. He can beautifully personify life, death, health, knowledge, and even more. I think a part of Beer could be curious to how he would translate her onto the canvas in his creation. Her believing in his talent was the driven force for her to take the chance for her to ask Klimt for a portrait; she knew that his talent would live on forever.

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  34. It seemed as though after her first portrait Friederike Beer just wanted more. She wanted to push the limits and get the best that was out there in the world. By using the best of the best with the longest lasting medium it seems as though she just wanted to be immortalized and be remembered forever.

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  35. While I’m sure the previous portrait Friederike Beer had commissioned was lovely, with Klimt’s distinct style the idea of becoming “immortal” is attainable. The bright colors, the vivid details, and the use of curves and organic shapes all work together to keep movement in the piece. An artist being able to immortalize someone is a great feat, and Beer implying that Klimt’s art could do so would definitely help convince such a selective artist to create a portrait of her. Another thought I had upon hearing this phrase is that having more than one portrait of one’s self allows for a sense of security in terms of immortality if that makes sense. On the off chance something happens to one of the portraits, the other still stands as a symbol of their life.

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  36. There is harmony in Klimt’s paintings; spirals, shades of brown and yellow are wrapped around each other; there is a quiet sadness. He depicts women as transparent and pale, with prominent hands, they wear very beautiful colored and patterned dresses, and they are covered in gold after peaceful, erased images. Women also loved the perception of women in Klimt paintings as much as men. It is as if he has done the analysis of all humanity and the human soul in his head, but he has tried to paint only the most beautiful aspect of humanity and make people love a human being again. Klimt’s woman depiction was revolutionary and immortal, and Friederike Beer knew that. She also wanted to be eternal with the self-portrait from him—such a wise woman.

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  37. When reading that Friederike Beer response to Klimt was that she wanted to become immortal my first thought was that she was seeking for a style that would possibly make an impact. Though she did have a self portrait from another well known artist I feel that Klimt specific art style especially during its time was very different from the non ornamented painting. Anyone can claim and paint a painting of someone portrait but I feel that in this case Klimt went above and beyond not just by painting a self portrait but as well as putting soul and life to the painting.

    I love how he put close attention to the flush of her face and the ornament of her clothing. Her pose and figures is very simple but well drawn. What I like is that she isn’t washed out from the background even though there is a lot of movement in the background. I think it was really smart of her to seek out a portrait from Klimt because his depiction of her portrait revolutionizes that immortality that she was seeking.

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  38. Her wanting to be immortal, to me, shows that she knew that Beer would be able to capture her in a way that no one else could. She saw what Beer created in his works and saw the potential of herself to be a figure to be seen for all time and seen by millions. Her gaze and presence is now indeed forever and she will live on to see hundreds and thousands of faces and be this immortal figure in the world of art for all time to come.

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  39. Arron Adams
    Art 473-1001
    In all honesty, the one of the first things that came to mind while reading this was to feel a bit bad for the artist that Friederike Beer had already received a portrait from; what was wrong with the portrait they did?
    The second thing that occurred to me was that to be immortalized in painting is to be remembered by those who come after; why did Beer feel the need to be made immortal by Klimt? Did she have no one who cared about her and would remember her when she was gone?
    I don’t have any answers to these questions, but they are some of the things that come to mind regarding this post.

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