Vincent Van Gogh

“In painting I want to say something comforting in the way music is comforting. I want to paint men and women with that element of the eternal that was formerly symbolized by the halo, and that we try to express by the actual radiance and vibration of our colours.”

(Vincent Van Gogh, letter to his brother Theo, 1888)

Vincent has become the post-child symbolizing the crazy, mad ‘modern’ artist (genius?) for many in the Western World. His life was a life of constant struggle on so many levels as we will see as we start investigating the emergence of a “cry for freedom” within the ranks of the creative class—notably the artists.

In his paintings, Vincent unleashed the power of line, the strength of color, and the audacity of his vision. Isn’t that what we have come to expect of the creative class? Of our artists? During Vincent’s lifetime, men and women for the most part would have nothing to do with Vincent. He was different. He was possessed! (In the 1880s, Europe felt epilepsy was akin to being possessed by Satan! Vincent, when he experienced an epileptic seizure, could see that fear and loathing in the eyes of those who just happened to be in his space when he had a seizure. Emotionally, that visual experience for Vincent was crushing. His dying words to his brother, Theo were the following: “Misery will never end.”

What are your initial thoughts regarding Vincent as we enter our study of the early world of Modern Art? And more importantly, with Vincent as the protagonist here, What do you want your artists to be?

Meet Vincent Van Gogh Experience: a touring interactive exhibition bringing the artist’s story to life

Published by: roberttracyphd

Academic professor at the University of Nevada Las Vegas. I teach theory courses in Art and Architecture History. In addition, I also curate exhibitions on campus as well as in other venues nationally and internationally.

37 Comments

37 thoughts on “Vincent Van Gogh”

  1. This past April I did an opinion paper on Van Gogh museum in Amsterdam and the one thing I remember the most about him was that with all the self portraits he had it was nothing to do with painting himself. He enjoyed the exercise, the brushwork and the facial expressions he created in the colors. That’s what I like about an artist to be creative and intelligent about his art to base it around life.

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  2. I think without his epilepsy we never would have been left with the works we have been given by Vincent Van Gogh. This ‘disability’ of his that was looked down upon by society created the secluded man that used art as a gateway to communicate his deep, personal intents. Alone, in the quote above, he states how he wants art to be used as a form of comfort to other people. In the long run, I believe he used his own creation of art as his comfort in the world.
    My initial reaction to Vincent Van Gogh’s work was that I actually don’t like it very much. I know many people will be outraged that I have said this, but I was lucky enough to go to the Vincent Van Gogh museum in Amsterdam. As a young student and aspiring artist, I feel society told me to like Van Gogh. I found it most surprising when I went to see his work in person, at how much I didn’t actually care, conceptually for his work. I can however appreciate the progression of his work. He really was not very good at perspective in his younger work, but as time goes on you can see how this changes. How he learns and grows through practice, dedication, and time. This is what I take away from Van Gogh as an artist. Along with his layering of color to build up depth and texture within his work. These are the concepts I appreciate and take away from Vincent Van Gogh as a historical figure within the art world.

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  3. Vincent has always been one of my inspirations. I enjoy his expressive stroke and color, they are engraved with Vincent’s personality. Base on what I learned from him, he dedicated enormous time on searching his style and method. Even though he didn’t receive enough support, but he never stops painting. The passion he have is madness to an extent. I want my artist to be dedicated and intuitive. He or she will endlessly exploring and find passion in arts.

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  4. Hi I’m Tammy Martinez
    When I think of Vincent Van Gogh I think about a man who struggled with mental illness that was also misunderstood during his lifetime. I think everyone is familiar with Vincent Van Gogh whether it’s from his famous overproduced painting Starry Night or being recognized as the artist who cut his ear off. I think most people overlook his art over his struggles while others find inspiration from his struggles. I think what attracts people to him is the fact that he never got to see his true success in his lifetime. It is a tragic underdog story and it inspires other artists who sometimes can relate to being unknown in the art community. An example is Frida Kahlo, her art reflects her life and people are drawn to that. Now her work is mass produced just like Vincent’s work.
    From what I know he seemed to be a humbled man who was struggling to make a living off of his art. He also produced a lot of work during his lifetime and was influenced by Monet’s paintings and Japanese art. His later paintings have an impressionistic style that pop out. Most of his paintings have multicolored strokes that create a hallucinatory effect. The way he implemented movement through brushstrokes is extraordinary. I can see Monet’s influence in his paintings but I think Vincent exaggerated his brush strokes more.
    In conclusion I believe artists should be humble and create as a collective. Great art movements involve more than one artist. I think artists should stay true to themselves and create ideas from within themselves while still finding inspiration from other artists before them. Artists should aim to inspire others instead of seeking fame.

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  5. My biggest association to Van Gogh is the song “Vincent” by Don McLean. I remember encountering that song on YouTube when I was younger and felt that it had quite a sad message. Years later, as I listen to it again and after knowing about Van Gogh’s story, it feels a bit ironic now. I feel like Van Gogh is the epitome of the “misunderstood artist.” Or that he is can be seen as a popular example/stereotype of the artist whose work is only recognized after their death. I also feel like stories like Van Gogh’s has shaped what we think is modern art in a sense that we sometimes veer away from the technicalities of art and look more at what the art could represent. Ideas like does it represent the artist’s feelings about current society or is it a take on a personal, physical or mental struggle of the artist? I feel like modern art really tries to look for a story within the art and of the artist.

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  6. As I got to learn more about Van Gogh, I learned that it filled with so many sad moments. I can relate to him in a sense that he must have felt so alienated and lonely by things in his life that he did not have control over and others did not understand him. Reading this blog today was a bit ironic. Just last night, I came upon a quote that I truly cannot agree more as a human and as an artist from Salaam Cinema:
    “Would you rather be humane or an artist? Of course everyone prefers a humane person. You see, I chose art for its humanity. I want to be both an artist and a humane person. It’s quite possible. It’s not a contradiction. To be an artist… you have to be humane. An artist who isn’t humane… isn’t an artist.”
    I feel as if Van Gogh felt feelings so deeply and went through so much pain. Feeling those feelings makes you human and I would guess that he would have wished that people can see him for who he is, past his “strangeness”. And I think that empathy makes him such a humane artist.

    Another thing that I think is really important while discussing Van Gogh is to not romanticize his disabilities. I think his vision was beautiful and so vibrant. He had so much to offer to the world. He accomplished that with his talents; he had all those within him and he let us in to see what he gets to see. I really really like to think that Van Gogh’s art and talents does not come from his epilepsy episodes or his depression, he was so much more than that.

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  7. I’ve always known about Vincent van Gogh, but I never took the time to look into his life and work. I like to think I can recognize his work as for one of my favorite pieces of his is “The Starry Night”. I just enjoy being able to see the brush strokes and how it creates some sort of motion in his painting.
    As I was reading some of the quotes from letters to his brother, Theo, all that crossed my mind was that he seemed to be really depressed about his life. That everything was terrible and his only escape was his art. With how society looked down on him I have to agree with what my classmate Kaylie said as to how he may have intended to use his art to comfort other people but in his time he was mainly comforting himself. It was his way of perhaps coping with his misery. I would like to think that now in modern times he can say that his art can be used to comfort other people, because now we’re not so focused on judging him but appreciating what he created. It’s a little sad that his he didn’t get to experience that appreciation, because maybe now his misery could end. I think what I most appreciate about Van Gogh is that all though he had such a pessimistic view on life he was able to push through his struggles and create such beautiful artwork with it.

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  8. I’ve always known about Vincent van Gogh, but I never took the time to look into his life and work. I like to think I can recognize his work as for one of my favorite pieces of his is “The Starry Night”. I just enjoy being able to see the brush strokes and how it creates some sort of motion in his painting.
    As I was reading some of the quotes from letters to his brother, Theo, all that crossed my mind was that he seemed to be really depressed about his life. That everything was terrible and his only escape was his art. With how society looked down on him I have to agree with what my classmate Kaylie said as to how he may have intended to use his art to comfort other people but in his time he was mainly comforting himself. It was his way of perhaps coping with his misery. I would like to think that now in modern times he can say that his art can be used to comfort other people, because now we’re not so focused on judging him but appreciating what he created. It’s a little sad that his he didn’t get to experience that appreciation, because maybe now his misery could end. I think what I most appreciate about Van Gogh is that all though he had such a pessimistic view on life he was able to push through his struggles and create such beautiful artwork with it.

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  9. I wrote an essay a few years ago for another art history class and remember mentioning how Van Gogh (along with other artists from the impressionistic movement) set a standard for more modern artists in the following art movements, especially with how his works weren’t widely appreciated until after his passing. Like mentioned in the blog and by another user, Van Gogh focused on line work and color more than the actual subjects of his paintings, and focused more on the process of creating than imitating something onto a canvas. He definitely had an impactful legacy and also influenced future artists.

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  10. The first thought that comes to mind is just about how tragic his life must have felt and been. It makes sense why it was that way that it was, and why his last words had to do with misery. Between essentially, being bullied, never leaving the house (and living alone), being an artist, and having epilepsy, of course his life would be considered to be painful. It didn’t help that having this crazy concoction in the time that he was alive, did not help whatsoever. For one, being na artist still could be look at as a bad thing. Two, anything ‘mental health’ related was looked at as having something to do with satanism. From all of this came something quite special. An artist that set the page for expressionism and impressionism. He was one the, if not the only, forerunner for the style and movement. Whether he painted for healing, or for the mere exercise of painting itself there is no doubt that something good came out of it. Which can be a weird statement in that everyone’s depiction of success and what is good can be different. Regardless I feel like the underlying message here and what I hope for other artists is that despite the amount of misery and struggle, something positive happens to that person or comes from that person even if, as sad as it is, its after their lifetime.

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  11. Vincent Van Gogh has been well renowned and appreciated in my short life time. Along with Gauguin and many artists in their era, they have pushed boundaries within the art world and revealing different possibilities in the early world of Modern Art. I have seen a film recently where Vincent was portrayed in named At Eternity’s Gate. He had a tragic and poetic life. I feel as if he was ahead of his time, albeit trapped in his own. Artists like him that expresses themselves authentically are artists I enjoy viewing and discovering.

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  12. My initial thoughts of Vincent Van Gogh is one of sympathy and awe. Due to the period, he was born, instead of receiving medical treatment, he was instead targeted as an undesirable. Vincent was indeed a child prodigy that suffered from extensive mental and physical conditions. With proper medical attention in today’s society, Vincent might have had an easier time healing and feeling understood.
    It is interesting to see the amount and type of color he used in his work. I feel that if I ignored the textures in his paintings, I would not find them to be works created by someone who was looked down upon or in disgust. The colors are bright and airy and have a lot of radiance to them. Vincent’s letter to Theo about wanting to express the halo’s symbolism in an imaginative way follows Vincent’s passion for creating, and I think that’s what I would like to see in all artists. Whether it be symbolic or not, the ability to demonstrate something from a new point of view is what keeps art flowing forwards.

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  13. I think Van Gogh’s pain and suffering is something that many artists can relate to, because this is often what causes us to turn to art as an emotional release, as an escape, as a coping mechanism. Artists often start out as outcasts, and Vincent was no different, although the fact that society deemed him possessed by Satan is definitely another level of being an outcast.
    To me, he did achieve his goal of creating work that is comforting. His use of vibrant colors paired with organic lines and fuzzy strokes conveys a sense of serenity with a hint of surrealism, like a fantasy or dream world. Interestingly, he compared it to the way music is comforting. As a music producer myself, I have always found peace within music. My goal is always to create a safe space through sound as a coping mechanism for myself and others, and I find it fascinating that Vincent had a similar goal.
    Although he told his brother that misery will never end, I hope Vincent found solace in his art practice.

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  14. Whenever I think of Vincent Van Gogh I always think of his mental illness and how he was so ahead of his time. It’s hard to believe that he was such a pariah. I’ve always been drawn to his later work due to the color palette and the freeness in how he handled his brush strokes, and I’ve always admired that despite his depression he was able to create such beautiful pieces of art.
    It’s interesting to think about what would have happened if he had lived today where he could have gotten the help he needed and the recognition he deserved while he was alive to see it. Personally, I think he would have ended up very different creatively if he lived today. He was such a pioneer in Post Impressionism and inspired generations of artists, so I think art movements coming out of the late 1800s would have been affected if he wasn’t living in that time. Also, if he lived today, the medications he would have been on for his depression would have negatively affected his creativity, and considering how it was his only source of joy and meaning, I could easily see him refusing to continue medication and end up killing himself.
    Vincent Van Gogh was such sympathetic, and bordering on pitiful, man. He created so much in his 37 years, and has inspired so many after his death. I’ve always struggled to let loose and focus on the act of creating rather than copying exactly what I see, so I’ve often turned to his work to help me push my boundaries. He is definitely the artist one should turn to for inspiration to create even when dealing with the darkness.

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  15. In regards to Van Gogh’s history and reading this blog, I felt a lot of empathy for Van Vogh. As we continue in our studies of the early world of Modern Art, I feel that we’ll experience many of the same situations with artists during this time. Many that have been misunderstood, many that have had their artwork appreciated and reevaluated over time and that’s how historians have come to appreciate Van Vogh’s artwork. It’s heartbreaking because this was a time where epilepsy was considered as a sign of someone as the Devil and so to see the pain that Van Vogh had to go through, you can really see the amount of work and dedication he put into his work.

    He used different elements such as vibrant colors and line figures to fully express himself and I believe that this is how all artists should react. Artists should be free to express whatever they please in their own canvas and while it is sad to see that most of Van Vogh’s work had so much torment and pain behind them, he was able to produce these beautiful masterpieces that are now highly regarded and recognized. I would want my art to mean something. Not only to myself but also to those that see it and I feel that same passion in relying on my art as a place of solace and peace.

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  16. Like the stated quote, Van Gogh’s paintings have comforted many people’s feelings through vibrating colors as like a melody of great music flows in a song, However, especially looking at one of his self-portrait with bandaged ear, I have always considered Vincent Van Gogh as a “mystery.” I have heard many different stories behind why he had cut one of his ears off, but the most supportive reason was that he suffered from severe depression. Considering that he is one of the most appreciated painters from history until now, I think it is very unfortunate how most respected and talented artists have suffered so much in their lifetime although I believe it’s most likely for artists to suffer in depression mostly because art intends to touch different parts of human senses. I am just so thankful for the great paintings that Van Gogh has left behind for us to look and the gift of comfort and warmth that he most likely needed.

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  17. If I am to be perfectly honest, I never took much interest in Van Gogh’s works, nor did I do research about the life he lived. As an aspiring artist, I realize this may sound crazy to many others. Despite this, I very much have an appreciation for the dedication, expression, and story behind his works of art after reading more about him. I am truly astonished by all the hardships he faced and how his passion for art was unwavering. Of course, I am also amazed by his talent. Where I was just only drawing stick figures at the age of nine, Vincent was already drawing so much more advanced things such as environments and actual people!
    I understand some measure of the pain and suffering Van Gogh had to deal with. Although I’m not the outcast society made Vincent out to be during their time, I was definitely alone at times regarding my ideas, how I wished to express myself, and how no one understood me. My passion for art stems from the fact that I have the ability to bring my ideas to life and express them in whichever way I want. Not unlike Van Gogh, I want to share my ideas with others so that they can find joy and happiness within them.

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  18. He is one of the biggest influencers within the impressionism movement. He created over 2000 pieces of art. His perspective about nature and landscape was influenced by the effects of his medication for dementia. Van Gogh paintings were influenced by emotional color and the use of brush strokes. The starting night is one of my favorites paintings, I like the way he added brightness in portraits and created a sense of movement in his compositions. The saddest part of his life story is that he became famous after he passed away, so his talent was never recognized while he was alive. Vang Gogh was treated cruelly at the mental hospital, but he’s an inspiration for those artists that still believe in their talent and never give up on exploring different artistic techniques. Sometimes the most known songs, films or painting in history have been the result of pain or a different perspective of seeing the world (surrealism).

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  19. Jonathan Quinones
    He is one of the biggest influencers within the impressionism movement. He created over 2000 pieces of art. His perspective about nature and landscape was influenced by the effects of his medication for dementia. Van Gogh paintings were influenced by emotional color and the use of brush strokes. The starting night is one of my favorites paintings, I like the way he added brightness in portraits and created a sense of movement in his compositions. The saddest part of his life story is that he became famous after he passed away, so his talent was never recognized while he was alive. Vang Gogh was treated cruelly at the mental hospital, but he’s an inspiration for those artists that still believe in their talent and never give up on exploring different artistic techniques. Sometimes the most known songs, films or painting in history have been the result of pain or a different perspective of seeing the world (surrealism).

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  20. “Corinthian Capital, 1864” Vincent (age 11)
    I was very surprised to learn this. Even though many know about the general things about Vincent, I somehow never came across this. That he was quite an intense prodigy and yet people still stayed away.
    “…without his epilepsy we never would have been left with the works we have been given by Vincent Van Gogh.” – Kaylie
    I can completely agree with this from the comment above. There was quite a lot that happened to him and the struggle that he had to endure, a lot of them being unfair, his paintings became an outlet and we get to see these complicated pieces.

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  21. Hey everybody!

    Van Gogh was a talented and tragic artist whose person and works was not truly appreciated during his lifetime. His stylized depictions, usage of color, and definitive brush strokes is unique to him. Van Gogh’s artwork is among the most recognized pieces of art globally today. I like seeing artists add their own unique style into their artwork like Van Gogh has with his. This uniqueness, broken away from the more constrained, traditional style of the masters is what makes Modern art so visually interesting. With his skills as in artist he was able to create art that is both extremely beautiful and lively.

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  22. Van Gogh was one of the first artists I knew about when I was a kid. Funny story, I knew about him because of a Spanish band I use to listen to, named “La Oreja de Van Gogh” (Van Gogh’s Ear). At first, that was all the connection I made of Vincent, but years later in my life when I was looking up about his life, I found relatable aspects of his with mine. I’m from Peru, and Arts in general, as a career, is not looked well by society. I read that Vincent was treated like a freak, and he was miserable most of his life (if not all of it). Art was an escape for him of the harsh reality or the feeling of not belonging, and it was also for me. Another kind of escape is the fantasy world that videogames offer, except that any expression of art allows us to make our own world from scrap. Vincent was taking refugee in his art world, which at first I just saw as an obsession, but later I understood it was a necessity.

    Although I knew about Vincent’s mental health issues (including epilepsy) I didn’t know that was one of the reasons why people treated him or saw him like a leper, as one of the lectures mentioned. I wonder what would’ve been the result of his art without these circumstances. Probably we would have not had a Van Gogh as we know him today. Vincent became famous after his death indeed, and even when it was sad to know about it, it didn’t surprise me. I always considered it as a broad example of “you don’t know what you have until it’s gone”, meaning what a talented artist the world had and didn’t appreciate in his time. Gladly, that changed over time, since he has been the artist I’ve seen portraited or made tributes the most (next to or similar to Kahlo).

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  23. My initial thoughts of Vincent Van Gogh were that he was indeed a genius ahead of his time. Growing up, everyone would always talk about how Van Gogh was incredibly talented and how it was only after he passed did his works start to receive the recognition that they so rightfully deserve. That was about the extent of my knowledge when it came to Van Gogh. As I get older and learn more about artists such as Van Gogh, although I do agree that he is receiving praise deservedly so, I can begin to understand the pain and hardship that this man endured during his time alive. This man was constantly being shunned by society, driving him even deeper into his lifelong battle with depression. Van Gogh was not a prodigy that painted to impress people. He painted because it was the only way he knew how to express himself.
    Looking at Van Gogh’s artworks, one can see the many years of practice, as well as the time and dedication that this man committed to expressing himself and honing his craft. One does not need to like any of his works to appreciate the emotion and effort Van Gogh poured into every piece he painted. Regardless, I think that artists that use art as an outlet for their emotions are always the ones that turn out the most beautiful. Artists should be the only ones that are in control of what ends up on their canvases.

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  24. Vincent Van Gogh is one of the most influential artists of all time. He did not get the recognition he deserved in the time that he was alive, but that did not stop him from creating artwork until he died. He loved to draw and paint about the lives of ordinary people, but others did not like his artwork. When he lived in Paris, he learned a lot more from other artists who lived there. He then started using bright colors in all of his work to make it more cheerful and pleasant to look at. He also painted the colors of the landscape, the night, and the sea. In his later years, he became more unhappy over time, but he still kept on going and his works rightfully became recognized as some of the best ever. I would want my artist to take their time with their work and create artworks based on things that makes them happy so they will have a great time working throughout his or her life.

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  25. When I think Vincent Van Gough, I think “dramatic,” the ear, his brushstrokes, the eternal misery, all of it just floods my mind with drama. Van Gough’s illness is something that caused him to struggle more than the average person, but that is also what made him so much more outstanding than the average person. I don’t think that “being dramatic” should have a negative connotation, especially as an artist, I feed off of the drama. All people do, it’s interesting and entertaining. Take away all of Van Gough’s artistic talent, and he is still quite a fascinating person which is why I think he did not get recognized for his art until after his death. He definitely encompasses the internal struggle within all artists, and that is creating something that allows other people to understand how the artist views the world.

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  26. Van Gogh may have been loathed and misunderstood during his lifetime, but now he is renowned as one of the greatest artists known to man. His struggle has been highlighted in so many modern films, literary works, and songs that he’s become a household name to even the youngest of children. He is also one of my biggest inspirations as an artist because of how much his own expression of himself shows through his brush strokes. They convey a look into his head and his feelings towards humanity at the time. And that is what I look for in an artist. I want to see their feelings through their work.

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  27. Hello everyone,

    For me being an artist I have always heard the name Van Gogh. His life story, artwork, letters and interesting love life have always been fascinating! I think the aspect of his work that stands out most to me is his style. The large, rough expressive brush strokes are so distinguishable, they can’t be linked to any other artist but Van Gogh. What I think is fascinating about Van Gogh’s life is that he was constantly going through set back and struggles, yet he always seemed to produce beautiful work. Many of these expressions appear throughout his work and you instinctively tell there was so much emotion as well as passion put into each painting. Both his life and his life work almost seem like something out of a novel. I enjoy how to this day Van Gogh’s is still celebrated as a world-renowned artist. As a graphic designer/artists I can really appreciate that.

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  28. Hello everyone,

    For me being an artist I have always heard the name Van Gogh. His life story, artwork, letters and interesting love life have always been fascinating! I think the aspect of his work that stands out most to me is his style. The large, rough expressive brush strokes are so distinguishable, they can’t be linked to any other artist but Van Gogh. What I think is fascinating about Van Gogh’s life is that he was constantly going through set back and struggles, yet he always seemed to produce beautiful work. Many of these expressions appear throughout his work and you instinctively tell there was so much emotion as well as passion put into each painting. Both his life and his life work almost seem like something out of a novel. I enjoy how to this day Van Gogh’s is still celebrated as a world-renowned artist. As a graphic designer/artists I can really appreciate that.

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  29. To start, what a lovely quote by Van Gogh. I think art is so powerful in that it has so many purposes, but one of the most important is comfort. Not only is an artist expressing their feelings comforting, but when the audience can relate to said feelings created by the artist is comforting as well. Having shared experiences and finding people who know or relate to your struggles is bonding. While Vincent Van Gogh is renowned in the art world, I’ve never been the fondest of his work. I do think he is talented and I am a fan of the way he utilized color and visual texture, but it makes me wonder if his “madness” is one of the bigger reasons he continued to be so well-known. The vibrance of his colors always get me to wonder if he saw things differently; viewing things as brighter and more organic rather than rigid and mundane. I have to say I do admire his dedication to the craft even if other people thought lower of him. I assume art was the thing that gave him comfort and the power to continue through his life.

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  30. Vincent Van Gogh is an intriguing figure to me because of how popular of an artist he is. Even people who don’t study/know very little about art have seen at least one of his paintings and can recognize it as his work, showing just how far his impact stretches. I personally think the most interesting part to me is that he created art that resembled the way he saw the world, which differed from so many popular artists before him. I find perception so fascinating because it changes drastically depending on who you talk to, their experiences, and how they choose to express what they see. I think that’s very important when it comes to individuality, and Van Gogh’s work is a great example of how the world looks through a different lens.

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  31. It’s ironic that Van Gogh became famous after his death. He used his audacity to capture scenes that express comforting and sense of settle, it shows that is his desire. In the process of chasing this desire, he loses. He eventually loses to time. Thus a question sparked inside of me when reading through the blog: How long can we wait? As a creative individual, just how long can we wait to see ourselves achieve certain goals in life? Will we ever be satisifed? Genius or freak, only time can judge the outcome. And Van Goah, sadly, doesn’t gets to see it.

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  32. Prior to my postsecondary education here at UNLV, I wasn’t too familiar with the personal history of Vincent van Gogh. While I knew he was among the most well-known artists to have ever lived, I had no idea just how tragic and painful his life was, which left me in even greater awe at the liveliness and vigor within his pieces when I learned more about him through personal interest and research; they were singularly unexpected creations from someone who fought battle after battle between both his mind and heart, which ultimately drove him over the edge. A few years ago, I had the privilege of watching the film Loving Vincent, which I would highly recommend everyone watch. Not only was it stunning in its fully-painted animation, but its story moved me to tears as it illustrated just what sort of impact Vincent left on those he knew and loved.

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  33. One of the most interesting aspects of Van Gogh is how little his art meant to the public at the time he was creating it compared to how much it means now. Over time his work has grown to such world-renown his name is well known, even to those outside of the art community. Van Gogh didn’t make art for the acclaim, but as a form of creative expression. In a world where social media plays a large role in how art is perceived, sometimes the artist’s intentions can be more complex, and artists can lose the sense of making art for the sake of art and focus instead on the notoriety or wealth that comes with the age of the internet. Someone like Van Gogh is a good reminder of art for the sake of art; as a form of self-expression rather than using it to please or displease the public.

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  34. This is late but I was thinking about Van Gogh’s epilepsy and how I learned about epilepsy from seeing someone have a seizure when I was a child. It struck me that, especially being so young, I probably wore some of the same frightened, horrified expressions Van Gogh stayed haunted by. I feel sorry for that. I understand how such an experience could give him the beautiful sensitivity you see in his paintings, however. I think an artist should feel satisfied by creating their work, making it true and authentic. Essentially I think artists should be genuine and passionate, just as Vincent Van Gogh was.

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  35. Although Vincent Van Gogh stepped aside and plunged into the realm of thoughts and dreams, he was also an excited, passionate, enthusiastic person. Art critic or any art lover, everyone will see something for himself in his paintings. I addressed what I found sad in his art. Otherwise, someone else may dwell on their work full of joy and go to a different evaluation. After all, no description can fully explain and make sense of the paintings he creates by revealing his life.
    Van Gogh is one of the most tragic fate of the 19th century. He always lives with the anxiety of existence and non-existence. He is troubled, unhappy, restless, and lonely, but he tries to evoke joy with his paintings, turn sadness into joy and loneliness into unity. He is affected by the despair and poverty of people and chooses them as a subject. He is interested in those who suffer; Like all melancholic people who feel alien and incompatible with the world. His belief that he will never achieve anything is his turning inside, doubting himself, his tragic fate, his ending his life that makes him gloomy. What differs from melancholic people who do nothing, contemplate, can be understood from the words “I prefer to do something unsuccessful by sitting down and doing nothing.” When he is distressed, he immediately draws something, so he tries to drive away from the pessimistic thoughts.
    The brush strokes and colors in the original paintings are extraordinarily vivid. It has its unique colors; more precisely, it creates its colors. His brush leaves oval marks on the canvas, rolling, like life. This is what I’m looking for in art. Originality.

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  36. Van Gogh to me is a very tragic character in the world of art that truly didn’t deserve to be. He was practically bullied the entire length of his artistic career for being different and not being how others thought he should be for them. Through self mutilation and mental illnesses, he struggled through a lot and never got to see the fruits of his labor in the limelight like he deserved to. To think that his work didn’t reflect all the suffering and hurt that he went through is remarkable.

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  37. Arron Adams
    Art 473-1001
    The way I see it, one of the great strengths of art generally is the power of connection – the ability to bring people together across great spans of time and space. However, not all art, nor all artists, connect to everyone – Van Gogh’s art doesn’t really connect to me personally very much – and I think that’s okay, but I feel like too many artist haven’t understood this and focus too much on the negative opinions of people to whom they’re art does not connect. Unfortunately, it seems that Van Gogh was one of those who focused too much on the negative, much to the grief of his brother.
    As for what I want my artists to be, it is not for me to say who or what other people should be, but for my part, I will prefer to create connections between people in my art making.

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